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Boeing to slow increase of 787 production rate and deliveries

Boeing to slow increase of 787 production rate and deliveries
The FAA said it is aware of the supply challenges Boeing is facing (Image credit: Florence Piot/Adobe Stock)

A Boeing executive has told workers the company expects a slower increase in the production rate and deliveries of its 787 aircraft as the plane manufacturer struggles with supplier shortages of “key parts”, Reuters reported last week.

In a memo to Boeing employees, the company said it still intends to increase the 787 production rate at its South Carolina facility in order to meet “strong demand”.

The memo said: “We continue to manage through supplier shortages on a few key parts.

“To that end, we have shared with our customers that we expect a slower increase in our rate of production and deliveries.”

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) said it is aware of the supply challenges Boeing is facing and that it is in “close communication” with the manufacturer.

The regulator said: “The FAA is focused on working with Boeing to ensure only safe and compliant airplanes leave the factory, and the agency retains the authority to issue airworthiness certificates for all Boeing 787s.”

Both the 787 and 777 have been in the spotlight after Boeing quality engineer Sam Salehpour testified in a US Senate hearing about manufacturing lapses found during production of some these aircraft.

Salehpour claimed that in some instances, Boeing would fail to shim the airframe properly, which could potentially lead to premature fatigue over time.

Boeing has denied such a case would lead to the alleged safety risk and maintains that no signs of premature fatigue have been found on older 787 aircraft.

The case unfolded as the plane maker was already facing increased scrutiny about its 737 MAX production and general safety culture following the door blowout involving Alaska Airlines flight 1282 in January.

The production and delivery rate of the 737 MAX also had to be significantly reduced as a result of the incident, as the FAA has stepped up its scrutiny of Boeing.

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